Blick in einen Hörsaal

Aktuelle Gastlehrende an der FHWS

Prof. Luz Espiro
Prof. Luz Espiro

Name: Prof. Luz Espiro
Herkunft: Argentinien
Entsendende Hochschule: Universidad Nacional de la Plata
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I come from the National University of La Plata in Argentina.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I started last year, during the winter term, teaching in the master's programme 'International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants (MRM).'

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
It is my first time here, and I am finding Würzburg a charming city and Lower Franconia a beautiful region.

4. Which is your experience field?
I am an anthropologist and do research on migration, specifically contemporary African migration to Southern Cone.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This summer term, I am teaching Module 5.1 'Research Perspectives, Methods and Ethics' and Module 2.1 'Development, Migration and Inequality: Introduction to migration studies - micro theories'. Last winter term, I taught Module 2.2 'Migration and Development: Policy and Actors - Latin American Perspectives'.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
A transnational research perspective led me to work in different cities around Argentina, Brazil and Senegal. During those trips, I met people in fieldwork, Academia and beyond that enriched me and enlarged my lens to observe, understand and engage in this diverse and complex world.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
I am a passionate anthropologist, an advocate of diversity and a fighter against power imbalances. Learning from others and contributing with my experience is my modus operandi.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
Question your assumptions and do not take anything for granted. Approach social dynamics with a sense of bland curiosity. Embrace people's worldview.


Prof. Sarah Richling
Prof. Sarah Richling

Name: Prof. Sarah Richling
Herkunft: USA
Entsendende Hochschule: Auburn University
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I will be visiting from Auburn University which is located in Auburn, Alabama within the United States.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I began working at Auburn University in January of 2017 as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Applied Behavior Analysis Master’s Program within the Department of Psychological Sciences. I teach graduate classes and coordinate the clinical placement and training of our students acquiring hours toward certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. In addition, we conduct research using a scientist practitioner model with children with autism and other developmental disabilities, with foster care youth, and with adolescent males who are housed within a juvenile detention center.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
I have not been to Würzburg or anywhere in Europe, for that matter. I was very much looking forward to coming to Würzburg for this professorship several years ago. Unfortunately due to COVID, I delayed those plans. Although I will be conducting this professorship from a distance, I am very excited to meet the faculty and students and hear more about this region and look forward to future opportunities to visit in-person in the future.

4. Which is your experience field?
My field of experience is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), which I have been studying since I was 18 years old. This field is known mostly for its therapeutic applications with individuals diagnosed with autism. However, I have worked with a large variety of individuals from the ages of 1 year old to 70 years old, with and without diagnoses, in many settings. I have worked in schools, homes, clinics, and detention centers in this field for almost 20 years.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This will be my first time teaching at FHWS. I will be teaching a course on Autism/Intellectual Disabilities. The course is designed to provide an overview of issues surrounding Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder. We will discuss the history and trends surrounding the treatment of individuals with ID and ASD, symptomology, evidence-based interventions, pharmacological interventions, and non-supported interventions. In addition to the course, I will be giving several guest lectures on ethical considerations of ABA, applications of ABA within the juvenile justice system, foster youth, and community-based interventions to reduce criminal behavior and delinquency.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
The most rewarding part of my career thus far is to be able to withness the development, evolution, and struggles of a field from it’s early establishment into current times. Unlike social work, behavior analysis is a relatively new field which has been growing exponentially within the United States over the past decade. Over 20% of behavior analysts have been certified in the last two years. As I mentioned, I have been in the field for almost 20 years, starting at the age of 18. Across this time I have seen the strategies used in intervention change and evolve over time and see the unfolding of a balance of science and human service delivery. It is amazing how quickly the field can change and how culture influences those changes within a scientific field over time. I am grateful for having the opportunity to be a part of the past and future of a field which is still developing it’s identity.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
The moving spirit of my work is accompaniment and advocacy; that is, to accompany individuals through their unique challenges and accomplishments with their own values as our guide and to advocate for the opportunity for to be successful and happy in life, as they see fit. My scientific understanding and training is only the means by which we navigate toward realizing their own unique goals. I may be an „expert“ in behavior analysis, but I am not an expert in other peoples‘ lives.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
My advice is to really listen and understand when they are criticiszed or their beliefs are challenged rather than be immediately defensive. I advise students of any science to be skeptical, especially of their own beliefs and to remain curious about seeing the world through a variety of lenses. By being open to seeing the world in other ways and inviting variability into our thinking, our ideas are able to evolve and we are able to make greater and faster scientific and social progress and to abandon ideas and methods when they no longer serve us.


Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye
Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye

Name: Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye
Herkunft: Äthopien
Entsendende Hochschule: Addis Ababa University (AAU)
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften
Module
:

  • MRM Modul 1.2 Social Work and Migration: Attitudes and Approaches die LV: Postcolonial Social Work
  • Vertiefungsmodul Soziale Arbeit in der Migrationsgesellschaft: Social Work in the Era of Post-Colonialism: Lessons Learned from the Horn of Africa 

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am an Ethiopian by birth and citizenship. I came from Addis Ababa University, established in 1950. It is the oldest school of higher education in Ethiopia.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I have been teaching at Addis Ababa University since 2010. I am teaching social work courses for both undergraduate and graduate programmes. I am also an advisor for MA and Ph.D. students.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
I haven’t been to Wurzburg before - this is my first encounter. But, I have been to Germany in 1994 to attend the International Coaching Course of the game of Handball at Leipzig. I played handball in a police club and the Ethiopian national team at a young age. My presence during that time helped me to observe the feeling of people demonstrating in response to the renaissance of Germany. Ostensibly, this is my second time to visit after a long time.

4. Which is your experience field?
Before I joined Addis Ababa University, I was a police commander at the Federal Police of Ethiopia. I served in the Ethiopian police force, as chief of police in rural and urban towns, head of criminal investigation and research, planning, and project department for more than 28 years. I joined the Ethiopian police force when I was 18 years old. I received an advanced Diploma in Police Sciences, Bachelor's degree in Education, MA in Educational Psychology, and Ph.D. in Social Work and Social Development Studies. I thought courses of Police Ethics, Human Behaviour and the Social Environment, Criminal Justice Social Work, Forensic Sciences, Human Rights, Community Policing, Criminology, and Victimology. In addition, I am a guest professor and visiting scholar at Bahrdar, Gonder, Wolega, Ethiopian Police University and Oromiya Police College in Ethiopia and Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in the USA. My publications are more about policing practices and crime. As a former police commander, I learned a lot about social problems and crime. Social work in the post-colonial periods and causes of migration are the ones that attracted my interest. My area of research is a crime, policing, migration and human rights, and organized crime.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This is my first time teaching at FHWS. The course I offer in this summer program is partly taken from the module of Social Work and Migration: Attitudes and Approaches. The objective of the course is determined by consulting the module. It is to acquaint students with the paradigm of post-colonial social work and its value to help people remain for long under colonial rule in Africa. The course widely covers the socio-psychological effects of colonization which helps the social workers to bring change. Likewise, the strength-based approach is what gives great value in general. It deals with the reason why people in the horn of Africa are vulnerable to migration and frequent displacement and generate ideas so as to minimize the burden and suffering of the people. The course is fully indebted to the perspectives of Social Work in the Era of Post-colonialism: Lessons learned from the horn of Africa. It defines the horn countries and historical development of social work to help the needy. The course deals with the major factors causing the horn community to frequent displacement and unwavering poverty escalating conflict. It deals with social work and the possibility it had in place to decolonize the social work educational curriculums.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
The most fascinating experiences learned are extracts from long years of service as a former police officer. There are multifaceted problems the community encounters and addressing problems is the one expected of the general public in general and the police officers in particular. Being engaged in the police means a lot to me due to policing means to love human beings. I am from Ethiopia the origin of human beings. Ethiopia is the only independent country in Africa after defeating the Italian Army on the battlefield of Adwa. I am proud of that. However, I feel sad when I see the living standard of the people. We are impacted by poverty and civil war waged in the past decades. The most fascinating experience I have had is helping women and girls victims of Gender-Based Violence. I would eagerly look forward to having social work supported by indigenous knowledge and seeing Gender Friendly Police in Ethiopia.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Loving human-beings, and working day and night to develop the social work profession in Ethiopian police are the moving drives of my work. Creating crime safe areas and maintaining gender equity are in addition to others.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
I want to advise young students to be inquisitive and contribute to their home country in general and the world in particular. Likewise, young scholars should be positive thinkers and loving human beings. They have to always stand for the poor and social justice. Please remove the mentality of the war to solve problems with the scarification of human life.


Foto Ngozi Chukwu
Ngozi Chukwu

Name: Prof. Dr. Ngozi Chukwu
Herkunft: Nsukka, Nigeria
Entsendende Hochschule: University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN).
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am coming fro Nigeria. My university is University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN).

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I have been working in UNN since 2014 as an academic staff (Lecturer) in the Department of Social Work.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
This is not my first trip to Würzburg, I have been there many times previously. The lower Franconian region is a beautiful place where one meet students from many parts of the world. Würzburg is a beautiful and safe city with beautiful parks and tourist sites. The Franconian wine is a real treat.

4. Which is your experience field?
Medical and Family Social Work.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
I have taught at FHWS before. In the Summer semester of 2019 to be precise. I will be teaching courses in the FHWS Master’s Programme “International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants”, in the area of cultural competence. The exact courses will be agreed upon on arrival.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
Being able to work with Persons with disabilities, families/persons facing challenges due to a debilitating illness, migrants and refugees; Others are ability to influence social policy as well as mentoring young colleagues aspiring to be social work educators.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
To help those in need.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
Openness and collaboration are essential for scholarship.


Nikos Xypolytas
Nikos Xypolytas

Name: Nikos Xypolytas
Herkunft: Griechenland
Entsendende Hochschule: University of the Aegean
Fachgebiet: Social Sciences

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS:

  • MRM Modul 1.3
  • MRM Modul 2.2
  • MRM Modul 5.2
  • Nachreflektion der Summer School Greece 2021
  • Weiterentwicklung der Summer School 2022 zusammen mit dem MRM-Team
  • Mitwirkung bei Forschungsschwerpunkten, inkl. PhD + MA Kolloquien

Gastlehrende aus dem vergangenen Semester

Ndangwa Noyoo
Ndangwa Noyoo

Name: Ndangwa Noyoo
Herkunft: Südafrika
Entsendende Hochschule: University of Cape Town
Fachgebiet: Social Sciences

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS

  • BSA 6. Sem. - Indigenous Social Security Systems in Africa

1. Where do you come from? Since when have you been teaching there, which is your experience field, research activities as well? In which faculty of FHWS you will be teaching?
Prof. Noyoo: I am based at University of Cape Town (Cape Town) in the Department of Social Development. I am a former Head of Department of the same department. I am now an Associate Professor and heading up a new research unit in the Faculty of Humanities known as the Zola Skweyiya African Social Policy Innovation (ZSASPI). My teaching and research experience is in social policy and social development, indigenous social work and indigenous social security systems as well as post colonial social work. At FHWS I teach in the Faculty of Applied Social Sciences.

2. Could you tell us about your new research project at your home university?
Prof. Noyoo: I am undertaking research into state social policy measures during the Covid-19 pandemic in South Africa. Furthermore, I am examining the erosion of human rights during Covid-19 in Southern Africa. Also, I am investigating the rise of xenophobia against sub-Saharan migrants in South Africa during a pandemic. In the same vein, I am trying to establish the roles of social workers in aforementioned areas.

3. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Which topics you will refer to?
Prof Noyoo: I am teaching a course on Indigenous Social Security Systems at the BA undergraduate level and a course on Post Colonial Social Work at the Master's level.

4. Are there any planned research acitivities at FHWS as well? What will they focus on?
Prof. Noyoo: Yes, there are already research activities I am focusing on with Prof Tanja Kleibl. We are busy looking at the linkages between post-colonial social work and international social work in these times of Covid-19. We are also investigating the migration of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants from Africa to Europe and the role social workers can play here. In addition, Prof Kleibl and I are busy editing a book with other colleagues which will be published by Springer. It is titled: Corona challenging Social Work.

5. When planning a mobility as a visiting professor why it was FHWS you opted for?
Prof. Noyoo: I came to FHWS due to my previous research work with colleagues who are lecturers at FHWS.

6. Tell us about your previous research work with colleagues of FHWS. In which countries you realized research projects and what did they focus on?
Pro Noyoo: Previously I researched and collaborated with Prof Tanja Kleibl on post-colonial social work and other colleagues. This work was spread in various regions of the world. My focus was on the African region. This research culminated in a Handbook which we co-edited with other colleagues. 

7. What have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your career?
Prof. Noyoo: I took a break from academia for close to 7 years, from 2007 to 2014. During this period, I worked for the South African Government in the Department of Social Development as a Senior Social Policy Specialist / Chief Director. I found myself at the centre of national policy development processes while institutionalising evidence-based policy decision-making processes, with my colleagues in the Social Policy Unit, across Government departments in the Social Cluster. I was involved in regional and continental advisory endeavours. Some of these assignments extended to the Global South. One of my fascinating assignments was in Cuba where my colleagues and I collaborated with the Cuban government and universities. After I returned to academia in 2014, I found my experience in Government invaluable for my teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It also guides my research initiatives.  

8. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Prof. Noyoo: My work is guided by the values of social justice as I want it to liberate people from various social ills such as poverty, social exclusion, abuse and all forms discrimination. That is what drives me in my work.

9. Which advice for their later work and projects you would give to the students at FHWS?
Prof. Noyoo: They could focus on international social work, migrants and refugees or post-colonial social work. 


Alexander Pérez Ruiz
Alexander Pérez Ruiz

Name: Alexander Pérez Ruiz
Herkunft: Kolumbien
Entsendende Hochschule: Escuela Colombiana de Ingeniería Julio Garavito Bogotá D.C., Colombia
Fachgebiet: Vermessung und Geoinformatik

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS

  • Lehrveranstaltungen im Modul „Vertiefungsseminar I (Digitale Bildverarbeitung)“ im Studiengang Vermessung und Geoinformatik.
  • Teilnahme an der ITW: u.a. Vortrag am 09.06.2020 um 18.10 h „Photogrammetry in AgTech from Images to Decisions“


Foto Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger
Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger (©QUB)

Name: Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger
Herkunft: Belfast, Nordirland
Entsendende Hochschule: Queen's University of Belfast (QUB)
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS
• BSA Modul 7.4 „Vertiefungsbereich Entwicklung und Förderung in der frühen Kindheit“ (Lehreinheit
   „Verhaltensanalytisch fundierte Behandlung von frühkindlichem Autismus“)
• BSA Modul 7.4 „Vertiefungsbereich Soziale Arbeit mit psychisch kranken und suchtkranken Menschen“
   (Lehreinheit „Verhaltensanalytische Interventionen“)
• BSA Modul 2.4 „ Klinische Psychologie und Entwicklungspsychologie“ (Lehreinheit „Frühkindlicher
   Autismus“)
• BSA Modul 3.2 Übung „Basic Strategies of Behaviour Modification I“
• BSA Modul 3.3 Übung „Basic Strategies of Behaviour Modification II“
• BSA Modul 6.1 Seminaristischer Unterricht „Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten – Durchführung empirischer
   Studien“

Bei Aktivierung beginnt ein Video mit der Darstellung des Interviews mit Professor Dillenburger