Studierende im Gespräch

Aktuelle Gastlehrende an der FHWS

Name: Herr Prof. Dr. Kune-muh Tsai  
Herkunft: Taiwan
Entsendende Hochschule: National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology (NKUST)
Fachgebiet: Fakultät Wirtschaftsingenieurwesen (FWI)

Lehrveranstaltung: 

  • Modul „Special Topics on Supply Chain Management” in den Studiengängen BLO (Bachelor Logisitk)/ IBL (International Bachelor Logistics) als fachwissenschaftliches Wahlpflichtmodul (FWPM) 

1. Would you please be so kind as to tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am from National Kaohsiuing University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

2. Since when have you been working at your home university?
I have been working at my home university from August, 1995.

3. Which is your function there?
I am a professor from Department of Logistics Management in my home university. The main areas I teach and do research include Logistics Management, Supply Chain Management, Business Ethics and Sustainability, Simulations to Logistics Systems, Smart Logistics, Cold Chain Logistics, etc. I also instruct undergraduate graduating projects and advise master and PhD students on their theses. I had been a departmental head, associate dean and dean for more than 10 years.

4. Have you already been in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to our region?
Because my university and department have been collaborating with FHWS from 2012, I have been to FHWS for quite a few times (7-8 times). Lower Franconioa is a beautiful place especially during the spring and summer time. This is my first time here during the winter and I believe I will experience something different but interesting this time here.   

5. What is your first impression of this region?
This is a beautiful, kind and religious region that is rich in culture and history with proud wine making and tasting conventions.

6. Which is your experience field?
I had my master and PhD in Industrial Engineering and have been teaching and researching on logistics and supply chain management (SCM) for more than 25 years. Some specific fields of specialization include channels management, ICT application on SCM, cold chain logistics, autonomous systems, simulations, AI and fuzzy systems, etc.

7. We know that you are also very active in the research department.  In which countries you realized research projects? Please tell us about your projects!
My research projects are mainly supported in Taiwan and they can be divided into three parts:

  • Research projects from NSTC (National Science and Tech. Committee) -17 research projects
  • Industrial projects from companies and institutions – 50 more industrial projects
  • Education/Research projects from Ministry of Education (when I was Dean of College of Management): Value-added distribution and cold chain innovation – 5 years, USD 2 Million and Smart Commerce – Smart Logistics/Retailing/ Technology, 2 year, USD 1.5 Million.

8. Would you please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or  fascinating experiences in your career?
Collaborating with FHWS in students and faculty exchange program is by far the most interesting and fascinating experiences because I can see how students from both sides learn and grow from this exchange program and this time, I finally engage myself in this wonderful program as well. Other interesting and fascinating experiences are to see the achievement of students, which rewards me the most as a professor.

9. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Stay curious on new things, apply theories in solving real world problems, enjoy passing knowldege and experiences to students are the major moving spirit for my work.

10. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars at the Faculty of Business and Engineering?
Faculty of Business and Engineering covers a wide realm of specifications. Among them, young scholars had better look for a few but related research fields to focus on. Expand and enrich both teaching and research materials in these fields and besides teaching, try to publish some academic papers as well. 


Prof. Dana Simian
Prof. Dana Simian

Name: Frau Prof. Dr. Dana Simian
Herkunft: Rumänien
Entsendende Hochschule: Lucian Blaga of Sibiu, Rumänien
Fachgebiet: Fakultät Informatik und Wirtschaftsinformatik (FIW)

Lehrveranstaltungen

  • Data Management and Data Science (Studiengang BIN, 3. Semester / Themenblock „Machine Learning“)
  • Algorithmen und Datenstrukturen 2 (Studiengang BIN, 3. Semester / Themenblock "Traveling Salesman Problem")
  • Vorträge in Vortragsreihe am CAIRO 

1.Would you please be so kind as to tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
Romania, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu

2. Since when have you been working at this university?
1990

3. Which is your function there?
Professor Dr. in the Department of Mathematics and Informatics,  Faculty of Sciences, Director of the Research Center in Informatics and Information Technology

4. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg?
I participated in the International Teaching Week since  2017.

5. What is your first impression of this region?
I always enjoyed a lot to be here.

6. Which is your experience field?
Informatics (Computer Science):

  • Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence,  OptimizationAlgorithms,
  • Algorithms, Data Structures, Programming Techniques
  • Computational Geometry
  • Numerical calculus

Name: Herr Prof. Oleksandr Melnyk
Herkunft: Ukraine
Entsendende Hochschule: Nationale Lesja-Ukrainka-Universität Wolynien, Lutzk
Fachgebiet: Fakultät Kunststofftechnik und Vermessung (FKV)

Lehrveranstaltungen:

  • Photogrammetrie BGV
  • Masterseminar im Master Geodatentechnologie
  • Aufbereitung von asynchronen digitalen Lehrangeboten für ukrainische Studienrede im Themenbereich der Photogrammetrie

1.Would you please be so kind as to tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I have the honor to represent Lesya Ukrainka Volyn National University, located in Lutsk, Volyn Region, Ukraine. The history of the university, as an institution of higher education, began in 1940, which included the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Geography. Since 2002, the department of geodesy, land management and cadastre, which I represent, has been operating at the Geographical Faculty.

2. Since when have you been working at your home university?
After completing my bachelor's degree in 2007, my master's degree in 2008 and my postgraduate studies in 2012, I was offered a job in this department. Subsequently, in 2013, I defended my doctoral thesis in engineering geodesy, and continue to work to this day.

3. Which is your function there?
I am engaged in teaching professional disciplines in geographic information systems and remote sensing at the bachelor's, master's and PhD levels of education. I supervise 3 PhD students, one of whom carried out his research at FHWS for two years. Also, at my faculty, I perform the duties of deputy dean in information and grant activities.

4. Have you already been working at FHWS before?
I had the opportunity to attend FHWS on a working visit in 2019. I was also a guest participant in International Teaching Week 2021, during which I gave several lectures.

6. Which is your experience field?
For the last 6-7 years, my field of interest has been focused on environmental research using remote sensing. I also have considerable experience in geodetic monitoring of engineering structures as well as microphotogrammetry.

7. Would you please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or  fascinating experiences in your career?
For a long time, I was part of an excellent team of surveyors engaged in monitoring the earth dam of the reservoir of the Khmelnytsky Nuclear Power Plant. The combination of working in the field and in the office, under the guidance of excellent scientists, has given my career invaluable experience and practice.

8. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Learning is what I love about my job the most. This isn't just about the technology, although I love that too, for me it's also about finding ways to be more effective. And always want to see what will happen next, and having the freedom to apply that learning to the work I do every day has been one of the best parts of working.

9. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars at the Faculty of Plastic Engineering and Surveying?
I hope the combination of international experience in the presentation of professional disciplines will improve their presentation and accessibility to students and will expand their horizons in areas where they can realize themselves.


Prof. Karl Korfmacher
Prof. Karl Korfmacher

Name: Prof. Karl Korfmacher
Herkunft: USA
Entsendende Hochschule: Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT)
Fachgebiet: Fakultät Kunststofftechnik und Vermessung (FKV)
Lehrveranstaltungen:

  • Projektseminar „Flood Mapping and Land Use Change“ 
  • Master Studiengang Geodatentechnologie: Geodatenanalyse, Co-Teaching 

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am a Professor of Environmental Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, NY, USA. The Environmental Science Program is part of the Gosnell School of Life Sciences in the College of Science (we like administrative layers).

2. Since when have you been working at your home university and which is your function there?
I started teaching at RIT in the Fall of 2000. I am the undergraduate program director for the Environmental Science Program and I teach a wide variety of environmental courses (Concepts of Environmental Science, Soil Science, Applications of GIS, Hydrologic Applications of GIS, Urban Ecology, and parts of the Environmental Science Graduate Seminar). I am also a campus leader in study abroad activities.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region? 
I visited this region briefly back in 1986, but not Würzburg specifically, so I would say this is my first time here.  I feel very much at home here – I love the rolling hills and vineyards, which remind me of the Finger Lakes region of western NY (except we don’t have all the castles and forts). I’m living in the Old City and I love the pedestrian zone with all the activity and shops. Always amazed at how easy it is to live in Europe without a car (unlike in America). And I love that I can try to speak German here and have people speak German back to me, rather than default to English.

4. Which is your experience field? Will you also do research activities at FHWS?
Environmental Science is my discipline (I am definitely not a biologist), but that is a very broad and interdisciplinary field. My focus areas are soils, hydrology, environmental modelling, geographic information systems (GIS), and urban ecology. I am here on sabbatical, and one of my goals is to help establish a study abroad/exchange program between RIT programs that emphasize GIS and the FHWS GEO program. I will be working with FHWS faculty to help develop/modify teaching modules and student research projects that both RIT and FHWS can use. 

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying at FHWS. Which courses do you offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This is my first time teaching at FHWS. I will be involved in a number of FHWS GEO courses as a co-instructor (notably Geodatenanalysen and System Erde) and observing/guest lecturing in a number of others. I am also teaching a Project Seminar in Flood Mapping and Land Use Change.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
I love how my research projects have evolved over time, specifically related to location, history, and current environmental issues. And GIS has been a key component to my work. When I was starting out my professional career as a graduate student, I worked on GIS-based erosion and water quality models in North Carolina (southern states in the US have a long history of erosion issues) and seagrass mapping along the coast of North Carolina (related to coastal erosion). In Ohio, where I taught at Denison University, I worked on ecological restoration projects, groundwater models, and sediment deposition linked to lead (Pb) from gasoline emissions (Ohio has a blended agricultural and industrial history). 

In New York, my research at RIT has involved mapping wetlands (we have lots or wetlands); modelling emissions from truck traffic related to hydraulic fracturing activities in the Marcellus Shale Formation (New York bans fracking, but our neighbor Pennsylvania has thousands of horizontally drilled gas wells); flood modelling for the Seneca Nation (Native American lands are sovereign nations and often are behind in government mapping projects); and looking at the benefits of green infrastructure in reducing stormwater runoff and enhancing ecosystem services and functions (urban ecology).

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
I love working on problems with teams. Environmental issues are complex, so it is rare that one person can attack a problem with all the tools necessary to solve that problem. I work with software engineers, policy scientists, ecologists, imaging scientists, mathematicians, chemists, and other environmental scientists with complementary skills. Together we bring diverse backgrounds and perspectives to our research projects and that helps us to develop novel approaches to helping address environmental issues.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying at FHWS?
Your program will give you the professional skills and training you need to succeed, but college students in the US often lack a global perspective and critical thinking skills. I tell my students the most important thing they can do in college is a study abroad program. Learning and working in a different culture helps them gain that missing perspective while enhancing their skill sets. Reading case studies is OK, but actively participating in a project or class activity (particularly in a different culture) gives you the ability to apply your skills and learn from others. So seek out those opportunities!


Name: Prof. Arturo Sousa
Herkunft: Spanien
Entsendende Hochschule: Universidad Sevilla
Fachgebiet: Fakultät Kunststofftechnik und Vermessung
Lehrveranstaltungen:

  • Bachelor Studiengang Geovisualisierung (2. Semester):  Projektbezogene Geovisualisierung II
  • Bachelor Studiengang Geovisualisierung (6. Semester):  Web-GIS
  • Bachelor Studiengang Geovisualisierung (6. Semester): Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten
  • Bachelor Studiengang Vermessung und Geoinformatik (6. Semester): Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
Currently I carry out my teaching, research and management activities, full time, at the University of Seville (Spain).

2. Since when have you been working at your home university and which is your function there?
Since 1999 I teach Plant Biology and Pharmaceutical Botany to the students of the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Seville. I also participate in teaching related to etnobotany and plant ecology, and I have taught in doctorate studies about Climate Change and human impacts on inland plant ecosystems and aquatic ecosystems.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?  
This is the first time I visit Würzburg and Lower Franconia. It has been a very pleasant surprise and an excellent experience in many ways. I love its vineyards and the student and happy environment of the city.

4. Which is your experience field? Will you also do research activities at FHWS?
My research began with the study of the vegetation of the Biosphere Reserve of Doñana (Spain). The first results showed that we could never understand the distribution of these plant communities if we did not analyse how they had changed, throughout the last centuries, due to the anthropogenic and climatic impacts. Therefore, in the last lustrums I have studied, in depth, how past (such as the Little Ice Age) and present (Global Warming) climate changes affect the vegetation and wetlands of this European space. Thus, we discovered the connection that existed, in the early 20th century, between its wetlands and the spread of malaria in Spain. Although this disease was eradicated in Europe over 50 years ago, in the rest of the world it still generates more than 200 million diseased and almost half a million deaths every year. These results posed an unexpected challenge in our research lines and gave us a new thrust and stimulus. From that point, one of our research lines was focused on unraveling the factors that triggered this disease in the past, how it was eradicated in Europe and how it is influenced by Climate Change. This could help us to better understand how to eradicate it in those countries where it persists today.

Obviously, one of my most important activities in the FHWS is to develop new international research networks with the University of Seville, and create synergies between the two institutions. We have already applied for a teaching innovation project between both universities. We are also trying to unravel the historical links of malaria between Europe and Africa, with the aim of better understanding the drivers of this disease. We are also working jointly in the study of the impacts of Climate Change on wetlands and vegetation, and we are going to get involved in the international projects of the FHWS on Tropical Neglected Diseases, which is a ground-breaking research field. For all these projects we are generating a multidisciplinary research team, in which we all contribute with our knowledge, from different fields of science and technology, in a complementary manner.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying at FHWS. Which courses do you offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
No, this is the first time, although I have had previous research stays in other German universities in Southern Baviera and Baden-Wutterberg. During my stay, I have felt extremely welcomed by the entire team of the International Office of Würzburg-Schweinfurt and the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying. I have taught about the possible applications of Geographic Information Systems to study the impact of Climate Change, as well as on how to use these tools to study vector-transmitted diseases (in Europe, many of such diseases are at risk of re-emergence). Another part of my teaching has been aimed at sharing with the students my experience as a reviewer and editor, of scientific books and journals, to help the students of the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying to write their first scientific papers. The fundamental idea is to transmit, to the future graduates and people who are studying a master’s degree, how to write a scientific manuscript and show them the main mistakes they must avoid.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career? 
Surely, the most fascinating aspect is to discover that science is an open door full of questions; when you finally manage to satisfactorily respond to one of them... new unexpected questions appear. In fact, I started studying the vegetation and its distribution, which led me to study the impacts of recent climate changes on inland aquatic ecosystems. In turn, these results brought new questions that remained unanswered, such as the impact of Climate Change on unhealthy wetlands and malaria.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
The curiosity to answer questions is a challenge for me. Why does this vegetation appear in Southern Spain, while it corresponds to a more temperate climate? Why has the vegetation associated with water disappeared so quickly and this desiccation is only due to human activity? Why is malaria concentrated only in certain regions and not in others? Are the foci of malaria linked to the presence of a certain type of vegetation or wetlands? When you overcome these challenges, they bring new questions that you never expected you would have to face. Moreover, all this helps me to teach the students to ask the right questions, giving them the appropriate scientific questions in order to solve the questions on their own. In some cases –after many years– you bump into an old student and, if you managed to have a positive influence on their lives, you know that your work is valuable to society.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of the Faculty of Plastics Engineering and Surveying at FHWS?
I would give them the same advice I give, at the end of the academic year, to my Spanish students: “Read books related to your subject..., read books of subject matters related to your faculty... and most important of all, read books about anything you like“. They would surely be better and more unrestrained professionals. In personal tutorials, I tell my students that the important thing is not the job position they reach, but how they do their job. I believe that consistency is a very important value in life and in the university. Honesty and professionalism must also be a necessary condition to carry out any profession. The joy of a job well done, that intimate satisfaction and the pleasure of letting science seduce you –in any of its paths– is a priviledge. These are challenges that await for someone to provide an answer to them.


Prof. Luz Espiro
Prof. Luz Espiro

Name: Prof. Luz Espiro
Herkunft: Argentinien
Entsendende Hochschule: Universidad Nacional de la Plata
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I come from the National University of La Plata in Argentina.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I started last year, during the winter term, teaching in the master's programme 'International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants (MRM).'

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
It is my first time here, and I am finding Würzburg a charming city and Lower Franconia a beautiful region.

4. Which is your experience field?
I am an anthropologist and do research on migration, specifically contemporary African migration to Southern Cone.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This summer term, I am teaching Module 5.1 'Research Perspectives, Methods and Ethics' and Module 2.1 'Development, Migration and Inequality: Introduction to migration studies - micro theories'. Last winter term, I taught Module 2.2 'Migration and Development: Policy and Actors - Latin American Perspectives'.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
A transnational research perspective led me to work in different cities around Argentina, Brazil and Senegal. During those trips, I met people in fieldwork, Academia and beyond that enriched me and enlarged my lens to observe, understand and engage in this diverse and complex world.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
I am a passionate anthropologist, an advocate of diversity and a fighter against power imbalances. Learning from others and contributing with my experience is my modus operandi.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
Question your assumptions and do not take anything for granted. Approach social dynamics with a sense of bland curiosity. Embrace people's worldview.


Prof. Sarah Richling
Prof. Sarah Richling

Name: Prof. Sarah Richling
Herkunft: USA
Entsendende Hochschule: Auburn University
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I will be visiting from Auburn University which is located in Auburn, Alabama within the United States.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I began working at Auburn University in January of 2017 as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Applied Behavior Analysis Master’s Program within the Department of Psychological Sciences. I teach graduate classes and coordinate the clinical placement and training of our students acquiring hours toward certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. In addition, we conduct research using a scientist practitioner model with children with autism and other developmental disabilities, with foster care youth, and with adolescent males who are housed within a juvenile detention center.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
I have not been to Würzburg or anywhere in Europe, for that matter. I was very much looking forward to coming to Würzburg for this professorship several years ago. Unfortunately due to COVID, I delayed those plans. Although I will be conducting this professorship from a distance, I am very excited to meet the faculty and students and hear more about this region and look forward to future opportunities to visit in-person in the future.

4. Which is your experience field?
My field of experience is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), which I have been studying since I was 18 years old. This field is known mostly for its therapeutic applications with individuals diagnosed with autism. However, I have worked with a large variety of individuals from the ages of 1 year old to 70 years old, with and without diagnoses, in many settings. I have worked in schools, homes, clinics, and detention centers in this field for almost 20 years.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This will be my first time teaching at FHWS. I will be teaching a course on Autism/Intellectual Disabilities. The course is designed to provide an overview of issues surrounding Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder. We will discuss the history and trends surrounding the treatment of individuals with ID and ASD, symptomology, evidence-based interventions, pharmacological interventions, and non-supported interventions. In addition to the course, I will be giving several guest lectures on ethical considerations of ABA, applications of ABA within the juvenile justice system, foster youth, and community-based interventions to reduce criminal behavior and delinquency.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
The most rewarding part of my career thus far is to be able to withness the development, evolution, and struggles of a field from it’s early establishment into current times. Unlike social work, behavior analysis is a relatively new field which has been growing exponentially within the United States over the past decade. Over 20% of behavior analysts have been certified in the last two years. As I mentioned, I have been in the field for almost 20 years, starting at the age of 18. Across this time I have seen the strategies used in intervention change and evolve over time and see the unfolding of a balance of science and human service delivery. It is amazing how quickly the field can change and how culture influences those changes within a scientific field over time. I am grateful for having the opportunity to be a part of the past and future of a field which is still developing it’s identity.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
The moving spirit of my work is accompaniment and advocacy; that is, to accompany individuals through their unique challenges and accomplishments with their own values as our guide and to advocate for the opportunity for to be successful and happy in life, as they see fit. My scientific understanding and training is only the means by which we navigate toward realizing their own unique goals. I may be an „expert“ in behavior analysis, but I am not an expert in other peoples‘ lives.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
My advice is to really listen and understand when they are criticiszed or their beliefs are challenged rather than be immediately defensive. I advise students of any science to be skeptical, especially of their own beliefs and to remain curious about seeing the world through a variety of lenses. By being open to seeing the world in other ways and inviting variability into our thinking, our ideas are able to evolve and we are able to make greater and faster scientific and social progress and to abandon ideas and methods when they no longer serve us.


Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye
Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye

Name: Prof. Demelash Debalkie Kassaye
Herkunft: Äthopien
Entsendende Hochschule: Addis Ababa University (AAU)
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften
Module
:

  • MRM Modul 1.2 Social Work and Migration: Attitudes and Approaches die LV: Postcolonial Social Work
  • Vertiefungsmodul Soziale Arbeit in der Migrationsgesellschaft: Social Work in the Era of Post-Colonialism: Lessons Learned from the Horn of Africa 

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am an Ethiopian by birth and citizenship. I came from Addis Ababa University, established in 1950. It is the oldest school of higher education in Ethiopia.

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I have been teaching at Addis Ababa University since 2010. I am teaching social work courses for both undergraduate and graduate programmes. I am also an advisor for MA and Ph.D. students.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
I haven’t been to Wurzburg before - this is my first encounter. But, I have been to Germany in 1994 to attend the International Coaching Course of the game of Handball at Leipzig. I played handball in a police club and the Ethiopian national team at a young age. My presence during that time helped me to observe the feeling of people demonstrating in response to the renaissance of Germany. Ostensibly, this is my second time to visit after a long time.

4. Which is your experience field?
Before I joined Addis Ababa University, I was a police commander at the Federal Police of Ethiopia. I served in the Ethiopian police force, as chief of police in rural and urban towns, head of criminal investigation and research, planning, and project department for more than 28 years. I joined the Ethiopian police force when I was 18 years old. I received an advanced Diploma in Police Sciences, Bachelor's degree in Education, MA in Educational Psychology, and Ph.D. in Social Work and Social Development Studies. I thought courses of Police Ethics, Human Behaviour and the Social Environment, Criminal Justice Social Work, Forensic Sciences, Human Rights, Community Policing, Criminology, and Victimology. In addition, I am a guest professor and visiting scholar at Bahrdar, Gonder, Wolega, Ethiopian Police University and Oromiya Police College in Ethiopia and Kutztown University of Pennsylvania in the USA. My publications are more about policing practices and crime. As a former police commander, I learned a lot about social problems and crime. Social work in the post-colonial periods and causes of migration are the ones that attracted my interest. My area of research is a crime, policing, migration and human rights, and organized crime.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
This is my first time teaching at FHWS. The course I offer in this summer program is partly taken from the module of Social Work and Migration: Attitudes and Approaches. The objective of the course is determined by consulting the module. It is to acquaint students with the paradigm of post-colonial social work and its value to help people remain for long under colonial rule in Africa. The course widely covers the socio-psychological effects of colonization which helps the social workers to bring change. Likewise, the strength-based approach is what gives great value in general. It deals with the reason why people in the horn of Africa are vulnerable to migration and frequent displacement and generate ideas so as to minimize the burden and suffering of the people. The course is fully indebted to the perspectives of Social Work in the Era of Post-colonialism: Lessons learned from the horn of Africa. It defines the horn countries and historical development of social work to help the needy. The course deals with the major factors causing the horn community to frequent displacement and unwavering poverty escalating conflict. It deals with social work and the possibility it had in place to decolonize the social work educational curriculums.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
The most fascinating experiences learned are extracts from long years of service as a former police officer. There are multifaceted problems the community encounters and addressing problems is the one expected of the general public in general and the police officers in particular. Being engaged in the police means a lot to me due to policing means to love human beings. I am from Ethiopia the origin of human beings. Ethiopia is the only independent country in Africa after defeating the Italian Army on the battlefield of Adwa. I am proud of that. However, I feel sad when I see the living standard of the people. We are impacted by poverty and civil war waged in the past decades. The most fascinating experience I have had is helping women and girls victims of Gender-Based Violence. I would eagerly look forward to having social work supported by indigenous knowledge and seeing Gender Friendly Police in Ethiopia.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Loving human-beings, and working day and night to develop the social work profession in Ethiopian police are the moving drives of my work. Creating crime safe areas and maintaining gender equity are in addition to others.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
I want to advise young students to be inquisitive and contribute to their home country in general and the world in particular. Likewise, young scholars should be positive thinkers and loving human beings. They have to always stand for the poor and social justice. Please remove the mentality of the war to solve problems with the scarification of human life.


Foto Ngozi Chukwu
Ngozi Chukwu

Name: Prof. Dr. Ngozi Chukwu
Herkunft: Nsukka, Nigeria
Entsendende Hochschule: University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN).
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

1. Would you please tell us from which country and university you are coming from?
I am coming fro Nigeria. My university is University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN).

2. Since when have you been working at this university and which is your function there?
I have been working in UNN since 2014 as an academic staff (Lecturer) in the Department of Social Work.

3. Have you already been at Würzburg in Lower Franconia before or is this your first trip to Würzburg? What is your first impression of this region?
This is not my first trip to Würzburg, I have been there many times previously. The lower Franconian region is a beautiful place where one meet students from many parts of the world. Würzburg is a beautiful and safe city with beautiful parks and tourist sites. The Franconian wine is a real treat.

4. Which is your experience field?
Medical and Family Social Work.

5. You will be teaching at the Faculty of Applied Sciences at FHWS. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Did you teach at FHWS before?
I have taught at FHWS before. In the Summer semester of 2019 to be precise. I will be teaching courses in the FHWS Master’s Programme “International Social Work with Refugees and Migrants”, in the area of cultural competence. The exact courses will be agreed upon on arrival.

6. Please give us some information of what have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your professional career?
Being able to work with Persons with disabilities, families/persons facing challenges due to a debilitating illness, migrants and refugees; Others are ability to influence social policy as well as mentoring young colleagues aspiring to be social work educators.

7. What is the moving spirit for your work?
To help those in need.

8. What is the most important advice you could give to young scholars of Applied Social Sciences?
Openness and collaboration are essential for scholarship.


Nikos Xypolytas
Nikos Xypolytas

Name: Nikos Xypolytas
Herkunft: Griechenland
Entsendende Hochschule: University of the Aegean
Fachgebiet: Social Sciences

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS:

  • MRM Modul 1.3
  • MRM Modul 2.2
  • MRM Modul 5.2
  • Nachreflektion der Summer School Greece 2021
  • Weiterentwicklung der Summer School 2022 zusammen mit dem MRM-Team
  • Mitwirkung bei Forschungsschwerpunkten, inkl. PhD + MA Kolloquien

Gastlehrende aus dem vergangenen Semester

Ndangwa Noyoo
Ndangwa Noyoo

Name: Ndangwa Noyoo
Herkunft: Südafrika
Entsendende Hochschule: University of Cape Town
Fachgebiet: Social Sciences

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS

  • BSA 6. Sem. - Indigenous Social Security Systems in Africa

1. Where do you come from? Since when have you been teaching there, which is your experience field, research activities as well? In which faculty of FHWS you will be teaching?
Prof. Noyoo: I am based at University of Cape Town (Cape Town) in the Department of Social Development. I am a former Head of Department of the same department. I am now an Associate Professor and heading up a new research unit in the Faculty of Humanities known as the Zola Skweyiya African Social Policy Innovation (ZSASPI). My teaching and research experience is in social policy and social development, indigenous social work and indigenous social security systems as well as post colonial social work. At FHWS I teach in the Faculty of Applied Social Sciences.

2. Could you tell us about your new research project at your home university?
Prof. Noyoo: I am undertaking research into state social policy measures during the Covid-19 pandemic in South Africa. Furthermore, I am examining the erosion of human rights during Covid-19 in Southern Africa. Also, I am investigating the rise of xenophobia against sub-Saharan migrants in South Africa during a pandemic. In the same vein, I am trying to establish the roles of social workers in aforementioned areas.

3. Which courses you will offer at FHWS? Which topics you will refer to?
Prof Noyoo: I am teaching a course on Indigenous Social Security Systems at the BA undergraduate level and a course on Post Colonial Social Work at the Master's level.

4. Are there any planned research acitivities at FHWS as well? What will they focus on?
Prof. Noyoo: Yes, there are already research activities I am focusing on with Prof Tanja Kleibl. We are busy looking at the linkages between post-colonial social work and international social work in these times of Covid-19. We are also investigating the migration of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants from Africa to Europe and the role social workers can play here. In addition, Prof Kleibl and I are busy editing a book with other colleagues which will be published by Springer. It is titled: Corona challenging Social Work.

5. When planning a mobility as a visiting professor why it was FHWS you opted for?
Prof. Noyoo: I came to FHWS due to my previous research work with colleagues who are lecturers at FHWS.

6. Tell us about your previous research work with colleagues of FHWS. In which countries you realized research projects and what did they focus on?
Pro Noyoo: Previously I researched and collaborated with Prof Tanja Kleibl on post-colonial social work and other colleagues. This work was spread in various regions of the world. My focus was on the African region. This research culminated in a Handbook which we co-edited with other colleagues. 

7. What have been the most interesting or fascinating experiences in your career?
Prof. Noyoo: I took a break from academia for close to 7 years, from 2007 to 2014. During this period, I worked for the South African Government in the Department of Social Development as a Senior Social Policy Specialist / Chief Director. I found myself at the centre of national policy development processes while institutionalising evidence-based policy decision-making processes, with my colleagues in the Social Policy Unit, across Government departments in the Social Cluster. I was involved in regional and continental advisory endeavours. Some of these assignments extended to the Global South. One of my fascinating assignments was in Cuba where my colleagues and I collaborated with the Cuban government and universities. After I returned to academia in 2014, I found my experience in Government invaluable for my teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. It also guides my research initiatives.  

8. What is the moving spirit for your work?
Prof. Noyoo: My work is guided by the values of social justice as I want it to liberate people from various social ills such as poverty, social exclusion, abuse and all forms discrimination. That is what drives me in my work.

9. Which advice for their later work and projects you would give to the students at FHWS?
Prof. Noyoo: They could focus on international social work, migrants and refugees or post-colonial social work. 


Alexander Pérez Ruiz
Alexander Pérez Ruiz

Name: Alexander Pérez Ruiz
Herkunft: Kolumbien
Entsendende Hochschule: Escuela Colombiana de Ingeniería Julio Garavito Bogotá D.C., Colombia
Fachgebiet: Vermessung und Geoinformatik

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS

  • Lehrveranstaltungen im Modul „Vertiefungsseminar I (Digitale Bildverarbeitung)“ im Studiengang Vermessung und Geoinformatik.
  • Teilnahme an der ITW: u.a. Vortrag am 09.06.2020 um 18.10 h „Photogrammetry in AgTech from Images to Decisions“


Foto Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger
Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger (©QUB)

Name: Prof. Dr. Karola Dillenburger
Herkunft: Belfast, Nordirland
Entsendende Hochschule: Queen's University of Belfast (QUB)
Fachgebiet: Angewandte Sozialwissenschaften

Geplante Lehrveranstaltungen an der FHWS
• BSA Modul 7.4 „Vertiefungsbereich Entwicklung und Förderung in der frühen Kindheit“ (Lehreinheit
   „Verhaltensanalytisch fundierte Behandlung von frühkindlichem Autismus“)
• BSA Modul 7.4 „Vertiefungsbereich Soziale Arbeit mit psychisch kranken und suchtkranken Menschen“
   (Lehreinheit „Verhaltensanalytische Interventionen“)
• BSA Modul 2.4 „ Klinische Psychologie und Entwicklungspsychologie“ (Lehreinheit „Frühkindlicher
   Autismus“)
• BSA Modul 3.2 Übung „Basic Strategies of Behaviour Modification I“
• BSA Modul 3.3 Übung „Basic Strategies of Behaviour Modification II“
• BSA Modul 6.1 Seminaristischer Unterricht „Wissenschaftliches Arbeiten – Durchführung empirischer
   Studien“

Bei Aktivierung beginnt ein Video mit der Darstellung des Interviews mit Professor Dillenburger